Why Is Mammoth Ivory Colored?

If you have seen mammoth ivory sculptures with hues of blue, grey or brown, you might be wondering about the authenticity of the ivory. No, it is not a fake. Mammoth ivory is sourced from the skeletal remains of wooly mammoths that lay buried in the Tundra permafrost ever since the last Ice Age ended. Most of the tusks found in Siberia date around 10,000 to 40,000 years ago and as the mammoths are an extinct species, it is perfectly legal to trade in it unlike elephant ivory.

Mammoth ivory is harder than elephant ivory and most of it comes with a slight brown discoloration due to being buried in the mineral rich permafrost for centuries. The bark or the external layer of ivory absorbed the minerals in the soil and has a range of distinctive coloration depending upon the particular minerals in the soil where the mammoth tusks lay buried. That is the reason that there are different hues available in mammoth ivory. A versatile range of colored mammoth ivory is used as knife handles, pistol handles and mammoth ivory beads.

Although pure white ivory tusks commands a higher price but colored mammoth tusk ivory is not fake or painted. Most of the commonly available pieces of tusks have an outer bark which is brown. Some artists like to leave the tusks with the brown exterior on the sides and at the bottom, while carving through the layers of ivory in the middle, bringing to the forefront the rich luster of delicate workmanship and polished ivory. Browse a large range of sculpted mammoth tusk and carvings at http://www.mammothivory.info

 

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